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Readers Comments (3)

  1. 2 of 4 people found the following review helpful

    5.0 out of 5 stars
    Outstanding…, November 5, 2005

    By J. Joens
    (REAL NAME)
      

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    This review is from: Purple Onion (Audio CD)

    You have to wonder at a world where a cd like Purple Onion is overlooked. While far from perfect, there are so many great songs that the cd easily earns five stars.

    Where to start? Well, how about “David Makalaster”, the ten o’clock newscaster, who reminds us that “anarchy is back in style”? Or, perhaps, “Whamola” – which I like to think of as Les’ cautionary tale about conformity, though the song is almost without lyrics! “Buzzards of Green Hill”, “Long in the Tooth”, “Ding Dang” and the closer “Cosmic Highway” are all outstanding tracks. The rest of the songs are…um…merely good.

    I don’t always know what Les is getting at, but I’m up for going along for the ride.

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  2. 1 of 1 people found the following review helpful

    5.0 out of 5 stars
    If Primus are no more, Frog Brigade are worthy successors, November 2, 2002

    By Justin Summers (London, UK) –
    (REAL NAME)
      

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    This review is from: Purple Onion (Audio CD)

    Over this side of the pond, Les Claypool and/or Primus are pretty well ignored. In this land of musicians who can’t play, rock music that doesn’t rock and creation lacking any creativity, the likes of pushing-the-envelope music like Les and the Frog Brigade are written off as ‘too complex’ for the masses; for the Oasis drivelling minions.
    Les, as usual, is king of the hill and anyone with a true musical bone in their body can, and will appreiciate this collection of joyful toons. The sense of humour is abundant – it even sounds a little Mr Bungle-y. Awesome.
    Gotta love the Frog Brigade. Even if Primus are no more.

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  3. 5.0 out of 5 stars
    An onion that makes you laugh, not cry, December 26, 2012

    By Al-Nabati

    Verified Purchase(What’s this?)

    This review is from: Purple Onion (MP3 Music)

    This is quite possibly Claypool’s finest effort both in terms of lyric and in terms of melody. After the opening track is done you are given one great track after another with only a few weak points.

    I say best in terms of melody because this album shows Claypool unleashed from the guitar-bass-drums constraints that came with Primus (not to say that Primus is bad; I actually love Primus but I love diversity of instruments more). In addition to Claypool’s usual bass guitar, upright bass and whamola there are drums, marimbas, vibes, guitars, banjos, violins, violas, and cellos all making appearances. It’s an absolutely engrossing album just for that sake alone because of all the different layers of instruments used.

    But even better than the instruments is the lyrical content. There is some mild profanity, but the topics of most songs are meant to make you think or to really notice the irony of a situation. The first example is track number 2, David Makalaster, written from the perspective of a news anchor who does his once-over-lightly on serious topics and then moves on, with the whole song pointing out that caring about what you hear in the news is not nearly as important or useful as actually doing something about what you hear in the news. Another excellent example is Ding Dang, a song meant to condemn hateful slurs and remarks–he uses some of them in the lyrics but always to prove his point, which is that society’s problems are created by society and all those who insist on alienating those who are even only mildly different from the mainstream.

    If that sounds too serious for your taste, don’t worry. You have track 3, Buzzards of Green Hill, a good jam tune where just the beat from the lyrics could work as a solid rhythm section. Then you have D’s Diner, panegyric of one of Claypool’s favorite restaurants, and the very final track Cosmic Highway which tells the story of a family’s vacation in outer space from the perspective of the child.

    This album stands out among Claypool’s work, and anyone who wants to claim Claypool fan-ship needs to get it, or at least listen to the tracks a few times.

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